Category Archives: Fishes

Whitemargin Stargazer Fish

WhitemMargin Stargazer - Uranoscopus sulphureus
Whitemargin Stargaser look’n up at ya

Whitemargin Stargazer fishUranoscopus sulphureus – Stargazers are not a fish to mess with. They have double-grooved poison spines behind the operculum and above the pectoral fins and wounds can be quite serious. Stargazer possess electric organs located in a specialized pouch behind the eyes and can discharge up to 50 volts, depending on the temperature of the water at the time! Because stargazers are ambush predators which camouflage themselves and some can deliver both venom and electric shocks, they have been called “the meanest things in creation”. The fish is often locally known as the mother-in-law fish.

Inhabits reef flats but is rarely seen because it lies buried in the bottom most of the time, with only the eyes showing. When buried, the cirri on the edge of the mouth serve to keep out the sand during respiration. The oral lure is used to attract the prey within striking range of the mouth.

This little fellow was only about 15cm long but they get to a maximum length of 45.0 cm.

Etymology: Uranoscopus: Greek, ouranos = sky + Greek skopein = to watch

Yellow Barred Jawfish

Yellowbarred Jawfish - Opistognathus randalli
Yellowbarred Jawfish – Opistognathus randalli


Yellowbarred – Tiger – Gold specs jawfish, Opistognathus randalli
Found singly with just his head showing in rock lined burrows on sand and rubble areas. They feed mainly on benthic crustaceans, invertebrates and zooplankton.

Jawfish are usually found in self-constructed burrows with just the head showing waiting for their prey, they have huge mouths for the size of head.
After mating the males incubate the eggs in their mouths!

The Devil Scorpion Fish

Devil Scorpion  Fish - Scorpaenopsis diabolus

The Devil Scorpion Fish – Scorpaenopsis diabolus, the false stonefish is a carnivorous ray-finned fish. It has venomous spines and is a bottom-dwelling predator that relies on its camouflage to catch passing prey. The inner sides of the broad pectoral fins have orange, black, and white blotches and the fins can be “flashed” as a warning.

Originally spotted using an ultra-violet light. They exhibit biofluorescence, that is, when illuminated ultraviolet light, it re-emits it as red, and appears differently than under white light.
Biofluorescence may assist in intraspecific communication and camouflage.


A face a mother may not love. They always scares the crap out of me when I see one, especially when they crawl around on their ventral fins.

JON bUCHHEIM